Tag Archive | The Time Traveller’s Almanac

Weed of Time by Norman Spinrad

Source: Own Collection
Format: Hardcover
Rating:  4 Stars
Reviewer: Laurel

This was a fascinating short story. The narrator relates in it how he has taken Temp (tempus ceti), the “weed of time” referred to in the title, and then attempts to convey how it has affected his life.

In short, I think Spinrad does a brilliant job of showing the reader how the narrator is in all times at once, and how horrendous that could feel. Not an easy concept to convey, and yet I think he managed pretty well with this.

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Terminós by Dean Francis Alfar

Source: Own Collection
Format: Hardcover
Rating:  4 Stars
Reviewer: Laurel

The story is primarily about trading in time. When people don’t like their lives, or they want to change something, they can come to Mr. Henares and sell a certain amount of time. Conversely, they can also purchase time from him – a particular event, really. In the story we experience events initially from Mr. Henares’s perspective, but then we also read about his clients’ experiences. This makes for an interesting and somewhat poignant tale.

I liked the Filipino flavour of the story, and the images conveyed in the words were clear. A lovely read, with plenty of food for thought.

 

Come-From-Aways by Tony Pi

Source: Own Book
Format: Hard Cover
Rating:  4 Stars
Reviewer: Laurel

In this story, we meet a man called Madoc who has arrived on the Newfoundland coast by sea. He doesn’t speak any understandable language, although a linguist suspects links to Welsh. As a linguist improves their understanding of his language, this fascinating tale unfolds of storms, time-jumps and metal.

This was, for me, quite a peaceful story – perhaps inspired by the Newfoundland environs as described in the book. Despite mention and experience of storms, nevertheless, the sense of peace remained as the story unfolded. A fascinating concept – that of an individual caught in a time-jump/loop linked to the date/s.

An enjoyable story, very readable.

Traveller’s Rest by David I. Masson

Source: Own book
Format: Hardcover
Rating:  4 Stars
Reviewer: Laurel

This was a fascinating story. In this world Masson creates, as one travels south, one travels down-time (time moves slower) while as one travels north, one travels up-time – where time moves very quickly. I loved how Masson further illustrates this by abbreviating names in the up-time latitudes down to initials, while in the south (down-time), one accesses the more complete (and very lengthy!) names of places and people. This was an excellent device, and added to the puzzle.

The story follows H, a soldier on the Frontier. He’s right near the sight-barrier, and the enemy is on the far side. Just twenty metres from his position. But he’s only there for a relatively short time – as he’s soon Relieved and must return to the South, where many years have passed since he left.

I won’t say any more about the plot, as to discuss too much more is to give it all away. But suffice it to say I really enjoyed this story. It was a puzzle to pick apart, food for thought, and all I expect from a story that investigates the concept of time. And a few other questions.

The Great Clock by Langdon Jones

18586183Source: Own collection
Format: Hardcover
Rating:  4 Stars
Reviewer: Laurel

This is a fantastic story. I have to say I had a distinct feeling of déjà vu that told me I’d read the story before, although for the life of me I have no idea where I could have picked it up.

In this story the reader meets a man who maintains a clock. But this is no ordinary clock. This clock is seriously massive, and maintaining it is a full time occupation.

Seriously, WOW. Yes, it’s perhaps a bit languorous, a bit blow-by-blow account, but at the same time it’s visceral, gritty and edgy. And the closing paragraphs just blow one’s mind.

Excellent science fiction fare with a few twists included.